Avoiding comma splices

2021-05-17T15:09:32+10:00

A comma splice occurs where a comma joins two or more independent parts of a sentence. The comma should not do this, but I see it every day. Here's an example: The CEO is on leave, her executive assistant will handle all queries. The above sentence has two parts, each with a subject and [...]

Avoiding comma splices2021-05-17T15:09:32+10:00

Fast grammar quiz

2021-03-10T08:48:13+10:00

Check your grammar knowledge. Here are three sentences for you to fix: 1. Woolworths are one of the biggest employer's in Tasmania. 2. Its Rosie here, ready to help with your enquiries at our new store. 3. The Chair will give the CEO and I a lift to the meeting. [...]

Fast grammar quiz2021-03-10T08:48:13+10:00

What’s the buzz at Hit Send?

2021-03-17T16:26:13+10:00

Our little team is growing. We've gained over 30 new clients over the past year, each of them producing fascinating and varied documents for us to review. Our workload has grown to the point it's no longer a job for one, or even two, hardworking nutters. I'm always mindful that responsiveness is integral to [...]

What’s the buzz at Hit Send?2021-03-17T16:26:13+10:00

Super-fast quiz

2021-03-17T16:27:37+10:00

This question might not be uppermost on your mind if stranded on an island, but I'm always harping on about 'however' as it's the most common punctuation error I come across. Which of these three sentences is punctuated correctly? 1. Tasmania's electoral division boundaries have changed since you last voted, however voting is still compulsory, [...]

Super-fast quiz2021-03-17T16:27:37+10:00

Punctuating ‘however’

2021-04-09T19:41:53+10:00

‘However’ is similar in meaning to ‘but’, with a longer pause built in. What’s tricky is that ‘however’ isn’t interchangeable with ‘but’, and it’s punctuated differently. In fact, punctuating the word ‘however’ is about the most common problem we see as editors. Here are some guidelines: But But is a ‘conjunction’ in grammar, and it [...]

Punctuating ‘however’2021-04-09T19:41:53+10:00

Zag-zig and hop-hip

2016-12-18T09:18:57+10:00

One of the wonderful laws of language that we know intuitively is the one that governs word order. It's called the rule of ablaut reduplication. Native English speakers have such an ear for it that it's highly unlikely they would ever get it wrong. This rule explains why we don't say zag-zig, or cross-criss, and rules out hop-hip dance. For those [...]

Zag-zig and hop-hip2016-12-18T09:18:57+10:00

Semicolons: endangered but not extinct

2021-04-09T19:44:41+10:00

For plain-English advocates who prefer short sentences, semicolons as a joining device are a no-no; but in the right document, for the right audience, they can greatly improve long sentences and bring variety to your writing style. At Hit Send we do see some pretty odd sentences with semicolons, however, so here are some tips [...]

Semicolons: endangered but not extinct2021-04-09T19:44:41+10:00

How contemporary is your English?

2021-04-09T19:45:05+10:00

Are your English skills keeping up with your modern lifestyle? Today is National Grammar Day – well it is in the US – and that’s my excuse to write to you about contemporary English. We all try to keep our skills up to date, and our English should be no exception. Short of time? Cut straight to [...]

How contemporary is your English?2021-04-09T19:45:05+10:00

Editing indefinite articles: A historic or an historic place?

2021-04-09T19:45:17+10:00

When editing, we encounter this fairly frequently. The question is: do nouns beginning with 'h' take the indefinite article a or an? Fortunately, the answer is easy – it depends how the word beginning with ‘h’ sounds – that is, whether the ‘h’ is pronounced or not. For example, in ‘a hot dog’ the h is pronounced, but [...]

Editing indefinite articles: A historic or an historic place?2021-04-09T19:45:17+10:00

From Misspelled Monday to Phonetic Friday: An editor’s week

2016-10-14T03:34:14+10:00

Hit Send runs a series of grammar tips and thoughts on our Facebook page. Here's a selection of the best for you. Misspelled Monday On ‪Misspelled Monday‬, I recall this useful spelling principle. A school principal is a prince and a pal (well, once you reach year 12), and the same applies to anything of foremost importance. A [...]

From Misspelled Monday to Phonetic Friday: An editor’s week2016-10-14T03:34:14+10:00